SOAWR

A NEW PRACTICAL GUIDE ON USING THE GROUNDBREAKING PROTOCOL ON RIGHTS OF WOMEN IN AFRICA

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HOW-TO-GUIDE WILL EQUIP ACTIVISTS WITH STRONG TOOLS TO PROTECT AND ADVANCE AFRICAN WOMEN’S RIGHTS

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Click here to download the guide in Portuguese

Nairobi, Kenya – Equality Now in conjunction with Solidarity for African Women’s Rights (SOAWR) is delighted to announce the release of A Guide to Using the Protocol on the Rights of Women in Africa for Legal Action. The release of this manual comes 5 years after the Protocol came into force. “We hope African lawyers and women’s rights advocates find the manual useful and it gives them hands-on guidance on how best to apply the remarkable standards of the Protocol in cases of violations of women’s rights,” said Faiza Jama Mohamed, Nairobi Office Director of Equality Now, which convenes SOAWR, a coalition of 44 civil society organizations working to ensure that the Women’s Protocol is ratified and implemented across the continent.

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SOAWR essay competition: read the finalists' essays!

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The judging panel was pleased to receive well thought out and well-written essays from youth from different parts of the continent who all emphasize the importance of the Protocol and urge governments to fully commit to its implementation. Nonyelum Umeasiegbu, for example, informs us that “If the charter had been implemented even a year after its declaration, I would not have lost my friend to child birth”. Nevertheless, she remains optimistic of the possibility of equality that comes with implementation of the Protocol—optimism shared by Laurence Lemogo who writes (in French), “The Maputo Protocol, specific text, directly addresses African women’s rights and is, unquestionably, progress towards the pinnacle of their liberation.” And yet, according to Itodo Samuel Anthony, “This protocol thus provides a powerful tool for change but it needs to be popularized. In spite of my exposure, it took me this essay contest to hear of it for the first time…To make the protocol effective, we would require agency, especially at the grassroots”. Thus, as Nelly Nguegan concludes (in French), “What remains is to popularize the Protocol so that no one is ignorant of the law and, above all, to apply it for the success of the struggle. Is this thus not what is at stake and the importance of the Protocol: its application?”