Ms Faiza Mohamed

Eleven years ago, African states made formidable progress by jointly adopting the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa, also known as the Maputo Protocol - regarded as one of the most progressive women’s and human rights instruments in the world. Its signing, ratification and implementation would have a momentous effect on the rights of women on a continent that has historically seen women bear the multiple brunt of poverty, exclusion and experience wars and civil unrests.

[html format="ckeditor" different_values="0"]

The Maputo Protocol is a ground-breaking women’s rights legal instrument that expands and reinforces the rights provided in other human rights instruments.

[/html]
[html format="ckeditor" different_values="0"]

In 2003, the Africa Union (AU) adopted the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. Today, only 27 countries have ratified. It is only Rwanda, to the best of my knowledge, that has done a comprehensive review of its laws to {{to make them compatible with the AU women’s protocol.

[/html]